Satodigi(tal): The Vision of Co-operative Platform-Enabled Sustainable (Digital) Production Landscape Management

Draft formulation of a Japan-specific vision from a Platform Cooperativism Japan (PCJ) perspective.

Escaping (Psycho-)Logic Traps for Better Solutions

Summary. Social traps are situations in which individuals take rational (and often egoist) short-term decisions that, however, lead to negative collective results in the long-term. Some psycho-(logic) traps involve an isolating and limiting view on available behavioral choices. Because everyone needs to feel competent to take future action, the failure trap lets people deny their potential for further learning and engage in task-irrelevant actionism. The sunk cost fallacy is such … Continue reading

How poorly do we understand animal-human (dis-)similarity?

The question of animal-human similarity is essential to decide whether animals should be treated alike [1] and whether animals possess rights [2]. What characteristic determines a human being as distinct from animals? What about people with genetic anomalies or other disabilities on the one hand side, and, for example, especially well trained chimpanzees on the other [3]? Proponents of animals’ legal status as private property that can be exploited by … Continue reading

Platform Cooperativism: Democratically Run Digital Organizations

Cooperatives in Japan (Article Series): Part 4/4 – Overview of the Japanese Cooperative sector

Overview and Conclusion article for Part 1 – Part 4, please see here. In this article, several Japanese co-operatives of different types and from various sectors are briefly introduced. The goal is not to create a directory in the sense of a comprehensive list, but rather to distill essential characteristics of the co-operative sector and the solidarity economy in Japan. The facts presented in this article need to be understood in … Continue reading

Cooperatives in Japan (Article Series): Part 3/4 – The Japanese Social Economy, Policymaking, and Co-operative Governance

The “Third Sector” (Social Economy) Overview and Conclusion article for Part 1 – Part 4, please see here. The “third sector,” or social economy, is the space of social issues that are left by government and private sector (corporate) failures. It is the arena in which the two actors after-negotiate how to share the burden to resolve the problems they feel could fire back if not addressed.   Japanese governmental statistics … Continue reading

Cooperatives in Japan (Article Series): Part 2/4 – Cooperative Advantages

Overview and Conclusion article for Part 1 – Part 4, please see here. To make it clear right up front: cooperation isn’t just an idea; it is instead a universal need and natural law for human thriving, be it in one’s spiritual connections, interpersonal relations, or business matters. Member-owned cooperative organizations as they are institutionalized are not only an alternative to shareholder directed corporations; they are necessary for a fairer working … Continue reading

Cooperatives in Japan (Article Series): Part 1/4 – Challenges and the Necessity for Cooperatives

Overview and Conclusion article for Part 1 – Part 4, please see here. The article presents Japan-specific details related to economic, demographic, and cultural challenges that can potentially be addressed by a more cooperative economy. Despite national peculiarities and unique cultural phenomena, the background against which the issues have to be seen should not be forgotten. When analyzing why social and environmental problems cannot be improved, one will always be … Continue reading

Cooperatives in Japan (Article Series): Overview

English articles about different types and industry sectors of cooperative organizations in Japan remain somewhat limited and represent scattered knowledge that would benefit from interlinkage. The series of articles in hand that I have published to the Platform Cooperativism Japan (PCJ) Consortium builds on a literature review that has proven useful in contributing to the creation of a holistic contemporary picture of the cooperative landscape in Japan. Japan is known … Continue reading

The People’s Disruption: Platform Co-ops for Global Challenges (November 10-11, 2017 / The New School, New York City)

    The People’s Disruption: Platform Co-ops for Global Challenges November 10-11, 2017 / The New School, New York City The first platform cooperativism event in 2015 popularized the #platformcoop concept, and the conference a year later brought together co-op and union leaders to push the model forward. This third event will zero in on ways that platform cooperatives can help to address some of the future’s most urgent challenges. … Continue reading

A Reply to the Article “Obedience” (ashiftinconsciousness.wordpress.com)

A Reply to the Article “Obedience” (ashiftinconsciousness.wordpress.com). PLEASE VISIT. Comment: Impressive (depressing) figures. Thanks for sharing as this is of uttermost importance. I’m practicing here for drafting letters to Gates and co. Why do these rich/powerful not change the world for the better? Because they just habitually might not change their convictions that made them multi-billionaires? Because they don’t see the chain of causes leading to inequality? Regarding Bill Gates, … Continue reading

7 WRONG Reasons/Excuses for Why We Cannot Change for a Better Cooperative Economic System

1 – We shouldn’t complain about capitalism, if we use it I heard this mean argument recently. Did we choose to be born into that system? That’s like telling the unfortunate living in smog; they shouldn’t complain about the polluted air if they breathe it. 2 – Communism isn’t better than capitalism Did I say anything about communism? I’m talking about Cooperativism. Co-ops can be for profit. The same business … Continue reading

Erroneous Scoping

Most of us have heard about the misery existing in many parts of the globe. 3.5 billion people live at $2.5 a day. According to UNESCO, every day 22,000 children die because of poverty. Why is it so easy to forget that? Good people end up by concluding that we do our best we can, because “we have it good here,” and we must be given credit for the care … Continue reading

Richer and richer

Ha ha, Gupta style (listen to the audio). A poem from my Indian friend Gupta san who still thinks he can better the world. Goooo, Gupta san! Who has the money? The rich who get richer and richer. Who is financing new businesses? The rich who get richer and richer. What kind of businesses do they finance? Profitable businesses that make the rich and richer. That means businesses where the … Continue reading

After World War III

Pursuit of wealth and power > World War III > Peoples’ recovery and counter movements > Ineffectiveness of old distraction strategies > World citizenship > Manifestation of the next human evolutionary step

Current ‘Happy Colorful Growth’ painting

1. Thought on art/painting Art can express the inexplicable. That’s  a remarkable potential we have because we still can’t explain the most important things, such as why there are ‘good’ and ‘bad,’ and what to do about it. Limitations in expression are limiting the thinking (yes, also this way round). We feel that there is something, somewhere in us, that holds more answers than we can explain with words. Art/painting is … Continue reading

I’m sorry I just drove by

I’m sorry that I just drove by In my elegant suit and tie Seeing you but ignoring the fact That actually I could act When I looked into your eyes I couldn’t hold the years of lies Must be the age of my daughter Your message I will teach her My main concerns in life Beyond the means to survive I can’t do that anymore If I have to accept … Continue reading

Solving the “everybody’s problem becomes nobody’s responsibility” issue

Predominance of responsibility at the individual level rather than at the societal-level Floridi (2016) is pointedly describing the issue around the distribution respectively diffusion of responsibility as “everybody’s problem becomes nobody’s responsibility” (p. 11). He suggests a framework that is recommitting responsibility for any action of a collective back to the individual by rejecting the concept of faultless responsibility, i.e., even when an individual would lack intention or information regarding … Continue reading