Lifetime Stability & Changeability of Personality (Developmental Psychology)

Summary. Research from developmental psychology is suggesting that personality traits are inherently stable across a lifetime. Some characteristics may explain actual behavior or predict future development. This post, however, examines the question related to how much of our underlying personality is “nature or nurture.” In summary, genetic factors are independent of age and sex influencing character stability during childhood, while environmental factors are largely contributing to changes during adolescence and … Continue reading

Sigmund Freud versus Hans J. Eysenck – The Development of Personality

Freud and Eysenck are two of the greatest psychologists of the 20th century. Indeed, both are living on in contemporary views and research, although, according to Eysenck (1996), Freud’s genius lied mainly in convincingly telling fairy tells. Indeed, the unconscious sexual desires that are making up entirely an individual’s psychic motivation are hardly testable and may degenerate into adventurous explanations of human behavior. It is the scientific scrutiny and broad … Continue reading

The Case for Measuring ‘Resilient Type’ Traits in Inuit Youth

Summary. The Inuit communities in the Alaskan regions of Northern Canada suffer from colonialization issues, such as corrosion of collectivistic values of family relations. Inuit youth’s well-being is depending on their cultural environment. Mental health problems, substance misuse, and high suicide rates are significant concerns. Resilience as a strength based approach to adapt to adversity is sought to be better understood to design culturally sensitive and therefore effective interventions. A … Continue reading

Psychic Blindness: The Object Recognition Problem

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Abstract. Do you know “blindsight,” when we recognize something without conscious effort? “Psychic blindness” is the opposite. Besides perfect eyesight, a person suffering from visual ‘object agnosia,’ cannot recognize an object due to the inability to associate the optical signals with the memorized concept of the object in sight. The same object could, however, be identified by the means of other senses such as hearing or touch. The article discusses … Continue reading

Psychological Interactions between Personality and Culture

Individual differences that determine one’s attitudes and behavior may not all be the same across cultures. Although culture is shaping an individual, e.g., through social learning, individual emotional processes remain, which lead people to adapt to and influence their respective cultures differently. For specific and holistic psychological approaches to personality, Western and Eastern (Buddhist) contrasting concepts of the self could be further integrated: Why not argue that “the self needs … Continue reading

Spirituality is required to understand human motivation and personality

Summary. More and more people in many parts of the world are becoming increasingly spiritual but not necessarily religious (Willard & Norenzayan, 2017). As a force urging us to quest for meaning in life, spirituality is considered to be a natural human condition (Kim & Esquivel, 2011) with individual preferences according to personality type (Hall, 2012). Contemporary psychology has to further account for the difference between religiosity and spirituality, as … Continue reading

The importance of intuition

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What are the “hidden” aspects, the unconscious parts of personalities’ mental functioning that is determining human behavior? While Freud is using the term ‘drive,’ ‘instinct’ and ‘intuition’ (more casually also ‘gut feeling’) are rather popular expressions too, while ‘instinct’ may be seen as a more inherent, and ‘intuition’ as a more experience based type of unconscious mental activity (Sun & Wilson, 2014). Intuition may be substantial for the humanist approach … Continue reading

Being driven or thriving? Sigmund Freud versus Carl Rogers on human motivation

Sigmund Freud suggests inborn mental processes, the id, which represents an unconscious and irrational force along the sexual development from childhood to grown-up personality (Ziegler, 2002). Freud used the term ‘drive’ to explain the unconscious triggers causing the variety of human behavior (Gillespie, 2014). It is the superego’s function to consciously guide socially compatible actions in a person’s hedonistic pursuit of pleasure (Cooper, 2010). If drive appetite is not satisfied … Continue reading

Romance governance

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If only everyone’s romantic satisfaction were guaranteed; The rest would settle peacefully.

Gaining Extra-Future

Timeless kindness is the extension of linear time and social relations towards the inclusiveness of the entirety and eternity of humankind. This socio-temporal intelligence’s purpose of maximized love and courage is to claim the extra-future that’s in for all. – Mathias Sager

To be extraordinary or to be just more ordinary

You were born with nothing ordinary about you, being a unique creation of human life. Through socialization though, you got assigned a social number, and you are expected to adhere to the norm. If you do the ordinary very well, you may be titled “extraordinary,” although originality, self-reliance, and personal growth requiring non-conformity would be much better indications of it.

People (and auditors) generally see what they are looking for

“People generally see what they are looking for and hear what they listen for.” – Harper Lee (To Kill a Mockingbird). This is also (or especially) true for the marketplace of audit reports.

The Association between Physical Activity (PA) and Cognitive Ability

The benefits It is part of natural aging that our cognitive capabilities may diminish. Cognitive functioning is essential for quality of life, why preserving our mental abilities is in the interest of our well-being (Edwards & Loprinzi, 2017). Physical activity (PA) plays a crucial role in developing and protecting mental abilities.

Research Ethics: Cultural Context and Influences

International research made progress over the past years to reduce the so-called 10:90 gap in health research by shifting some of the majority of resources put into a small selection of problems (Benatar & Singer, 2010) into other research areas. Nevertheless, one of Benatar and Singer’s (2010) conclusions remains to increase the capability of conducting research on culturally diverse populations. Jerzi (2016) is seeing the psychological body of knowledge being … Continue reading

Why Psychology Should Be Taught in Every School

Humanist psychologists strikingly identify globalization, health, ecology, and spirituality as areas of contemporary and future human problematic behavior, and point to a large population of depressiveness worldwide. Do you also think humanity hasn’t yet found a good recipe for peace, justice, and happiness? In fact, it is our all aspiration to make the best possible contribution to the well-being of all. Just, how to do even better as there is obviously … Continue reading

Sport to increase self-control and reduce aggression

It’s intriguing to look at self-control as a capacity to reduce aggression. In fact Galić and Ružojčić (2017) state that dispositional self-control, as measured with an according test, moderated negative behavior at work. Similarly, implicit self-control can be related to a reduction of anger and different types of aggression (Keatly, Allom, & Mullan, 2017). Maybe like from the after-school anti-aggression sports program studied by Shachar, Ronen-Rosenbaum, Rosenbaum, Orkibi, and Hamama … Continue reading

Power harassment and implications (not only) from and for the Japanese “corporate warriors”

This article discusses the definition of harassment as a form of bullying, then goes into further detail regarding power harassment, and adds specific experiences from Japan before the article concludes with possible interventions to be taken by organizational leadership. Workplace harassment seems to be especially important also in Japan as most extremely put, the Japanese “corporate warriors […] have considered their corporate affiliation as their real family” (Adams, 2012).

XY

Is it a crux the hierarchical matrix? Is it a biological gender reflex to weaken the other sex for a Rolex? No, rather a revenge for the monetary fix caused by the societal greedy X Is it to apology the societal partiality? Is it a gender norm of biography to deny the opportunity for diversity? No, rather a justification for the cultural why of the exclusivity of the Y

Under-recognized psychological aggression

Summary Aggression respectively violence both can be exerted physically or psychologically. It is of concern that psychological aggression is regarded as less negative than physical aggression, although victims’ experiences show that psychological aggression causes more emotional harm. Furthermore, aggressive behavior from males is recognized as more damaging than when coming from females, having its explanation in stereotypes of the forceful male and fragile female gender. Therefore, it is important to invest more into … Continue reading