Relational aggression in the form of maternal gatekeeping

Relational aggression Human aggressive behavior is any intentional causation of harm to others, and increasingly severe acts of aggression can represent even violence (Anderson & Bushman, 2002). Anderson and Bushman (2002) distinguish between instrumental and hostile aggression, the former being a means to reach a goal and the latter being a reactive impulse to harm an opponent. Relational aggression, as defined by Oka, Brown, and Miller (2016), constitutes a specialty … Continue reading

Shopping for Truth in the ‘Wild West’ of Facts Finding

It’s a good time to think about the phenomenon of “fake news”. I’d like to share what I have found when searching for “alternative facts,” “political deception,” and “truthfulness & falsehood in politics“ as related to political persuasion from a scientific point of view.

Approaches to political persuasion

There are general psychological mechanisms to be considered for political persuasion on the one hand side, and on the other hand, there are important specifics related to social context and means in approaching political debates. Still though, the development of convincing policies may involve a significant degree of experimentation too and continue to use the strategy of proving the value of ideas through trial and error.

Cultural effect on persuasion

Does the culture we are living in shape the way we get persuaded? I think the mindset may be determining proneness to messages. Indeed, for example Paek, Lee, and Hove (n.d.) found the possibility that East Asians are more receptive to norm messages for reasons of their habit to seek social conformity.

Fundamental and biggest human problem

The fundamental and biggest human problem is that men are ever striving for more profit leading to comparably greater wealth for the purpose of competitive advantage in looking for their wives. It is, therefore, our all responsibility to create the circumstances enabling women to more consequently choose wise and personally rich partners over financially wealthy competitors. If the war against insecurity and for love is matched with courage to more intrinsic satisfaction, no pursuit … Continue reading

Mindfulness strategies for avoiding undesirable persuasion

Of course, it is impossible and unwise to withdraw from environmental influences, because a lot of information and persuasion is necessary and useful. However, I am continuously interested in learning what influences are, for example, one-sidedly commercially motivated rather than seeking the well-being of all. I listed some main mindfulness points that I apply to avoid getting involuntarily respectively unconsciously persuaded. For these points, related concepts from social psychology was researched to get … Continue reading

How to frame a message that it is most persuasive (on the example of encouraging healthy eating)

Unhealthy diet due to excessive consumption of fat and sugar can lead to increased risks such as obesity (Kakoschke, Kemps, & Tiggemann, 2014). According to Pettigrew (2015), food marketers contribute significantly to pushing unhealthy products that meets the consumers’ desire for flavorful, easily available, and cheap food. How to frame a message that it is most persuasive

Solving the “everybody’s problem becomes nobody’s responsibility” issue

Predominance of responsibility at the individual level rather than at the societal-level Floridi (2016) is pointedly describing the issue around the distribution respectively diffusion of responsibility as “everybody’s problem becomes nobody’s responsibility” (p. 11). He suggests a framework that is recommitting responsibility for any action of a collective back to the individual by rejecting the concept of faultless responsibility, i.e., even when an individual would lack intention or information regarding … Continue reading

Reputation as the psychological currency to motivate helping?

Panchanathan, Frankenhuis, & Silk (2013) are calling the bystander effect (1) and diffusion of responsibility (2) a ‘social dilemma’ that I think would, in fact, be worth further prioritizing in social psychology. Let’s imagine the conditions for personal and social responsibility could be positively controlled for real life impact on increased help and solidarity among humanity.

Crisis in Social Psychology and Suggestions for Solutions

There seems to be a continuous crisis of different types in social psychology as a science, for which I provide a couple of examples from literature. I find this remarkable as social psychology could be considered to have the potential to help to solve contemporary problems of world’s societies employing advanced knowledge of humans, societies, and cultures (Vaitkus, 1990).

Evaluation of social psychology as a science

Characteristics of social behavior Social psychology is studying a wide range of complex social behavior regarding, e.g., aggression, attitudes, attribution, gender roles, group processes, health and helping behavior, intergroup relations, leadership and motivation, personality, relationships, and social influences (Richard, Bond, and Stokes-Zoota, 2003), just to name a few. It is key that “Humans are a cultural species,” as Heine and Norenzayan (2006) aptly put it.

Human behavior revolution

The jobs that pay enrich the greedy volunteers sacrifice to help the needy World’s common resources exploitation including worldwide transportation Is what is seen as creating added value to the controlling elite, for others untrue This counterintuitive socio-economic system represents the core of the human problem Technology invention isn’t the resolution need to support human behavior revolution